Review of KEM's new 2015 titration line

By Hank Levi on Tue, Jun 09, 2015 @ 04:11 PM


Review of KEM's new 2015 titration line 

AT-710S_M Automatic Titrator

I don't know about you but I have to admit that I enjoy learning about new technology.  Whether it's smart phones, cars, or kitchen appliances I think it's fun to find out about how a product has changed (hopefully for the better). For the most part a lot of consumer products see a change or upgrade about once every year. This is not really the case for titrators where maybe it's only every 6 to 8 years before we see a new generation unveiled.  I guess that's why I thought maybe it would be a good idea to take a look at this new 710 series that came out in February 2015.  I haven't actually ever written a "review" before so I decided to start by comparing what I know about some of the current titrator models and identify the things that pop out with the new titration line.   Here are my observations and comments.


Link to pictures and information about the 710 series titrators: http://info.scientificgear.com/kem-titrator-710-series-information


 

1. There are now three model levels; entry, mid-level, and flagship within each category (volumetric Karl Fischer, coulometric Karl Fischer, and automatic potentiometric titrator) 

My comment: I like the scale of the models as it can be helpful for those with varied budgets and needs.  I like the concept that you can start with getting only the basic model at first and then later bring in the flagship model and tie them all together into one system.  It will be interesting to see how people approach these options and whether the ability to expand a system is desirable or not.
710_series_titrator_with_2_burettes

2. All of the automatic titrators now can accommodate two burette drives

My comment: The automatic titrators come with one burette drive but being able to add a second burette drive allows an operator to run two separate titrations (titrants) without having to use an automatic piston burette.  Historically most titrator manufacturers offered only a single burette drive but it seems like this is changing.  It's kind of a big deal for those who run two different titrations and don't want to purchase an automatic piston burette.  I like this new capability.

3.  A new burette design for the automatic titrators and volumetric Karl Fischer titrators.

SmartBuretteUnit

My comment: The burettes appear they will be easier to store and swap as the titrant bottle, burette and nozzles all go together as one smaller unit.   The burettes are now "smart" burettes and can store all of the reagent information within the head of the burette.  I like this.

4.  More Input/Output options for operators to move  and store data.  I/O options include LAN connectivity/URL, USB hubs, USB thumb drive ports, .CSV file format, .PDF file format, barcode readers, foot switches, and keyboards.710seriesUSB

My comment:  More technology is built into these units. I think it was overdue so I am glad to see it finally arrive.

AT710_w_propeller_or_magnetic_stirrer

5.  Automatic Titrators now come with a propeller stirrer by default but can swap for a magnetic stirrer instead.

My comment: I like the option to do both but I think maybe the magnetic stirrer should have been the default and the propeller as the option.

 

6.  A new Wireless/ Wired 8.4 inch color touch panel controller (MCU).

MCU_screen_view_with_multiple_units

My comment: This only comes with the mid-range and the flagship models.  The controller can sit next to the titrator or be carried around like a clipboard.  Operators can control the titrator through protective glass if necessary.  I'm not sure how many people will elect to use the wireless vs. the wired connection but it's nice to have the added capability.  Nice.


7.  Multi-titrator integration.  The wireless/wired MCU can control up to 4 different titrators simultaneously (any combination of Karl Fischer or automatic titrator) 

MCU_controller for 710 series titrators

My comment: This feature is reserved for the flagship model.  I can see this being useful for those needing to run both moisture and acid for example.  Unfortunately the mid-level model MCU cannot be upgraded to the MCU flagship model so if you think you might expand later don't go with the S model.  Your better off getting the basic "B" model and then later tying them all together from the flagship model.

 710seriesmulticontrol

8.  Free method making software.

My comment:  All of the titrators now come with a CD that allows you to create methods on your PC and then transfer methods to the titrator.  You can also pull methods off of the titrator and edit it in the PC.  The software also comes with various popular methods pre-loaded to help get methods setup quicker.  I'm not so sure how robust this software is but free is nice.

CDstoredmethods




CONCLUSION:

Well I hope this was helpful in finding out quickly what the updates are for the new 710 series.  At this point since it's so new we will have to wait to evaluate how customers feel about their user experience and get their feedback on what they liked most and what they liked least.  If you have any questions or comments you can email me at info@scientificgear.com



 

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Can a Karl Fischer Titrator measure moisture in a solid sample?

By Hank Levi on Thu, Sep 15, 2011 @ 10:33 AM

YES IT CAN!Karl Fischer Titrator

You can measure moisture in solid samples including plastics, powders, ores, gooey substances that are thick and viscous, greases, and many more.  The key is sample preparation to ensure that a uniform material will be tested.  Once those details are worked out the pattern for testing is the same every time. 

You hear a lot about people running traditional Karl Fischer titration using direct injection with a syringe and needle. That’s pretty easy. 

 

So how do you test for moisture in solids?

For more awkward samples like a solid or solid-like substance we can evaluate the moisture using a Karl Fischer Titrator with an Evaporator Oven.ADP611 Solids Evaporator for Karl Fischer Titration

Believe it or not that’s pretty easy too. I guess that’s why we wrote this post. We wanted to let readers know that the process for running a Karl Fischer moisture test using an evaporator oven is not that difficult.  As mentioned already the most difficult part is probably working with your sample. To help show how the process works we created this short 7 minute video detailing the steps along the way. Please make note that the instruments used for this demonstration are the Karl Fischer Titrator (MKC-610DT) and the Evaporator Oven (ADP-611).

Hope you enjoy.

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Karl Fischer Titration and Water Standard Presentation

By Hank Levi on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 @ 10:43 AM

Kf waterstandard presentation resized 600In this presentation we discuss the basic Karl Fischer Water Standards and talk about some of their uses for both Coulometric and Volumetric Karl Fischer Titration.  We also describe some of the related problems that can be identified and overcome by using Karl Fischer Water Standards.

  • Karl Fischer Water Standards
  • Why we use them
  • Coulometric Karl Fischer
  • Volumetric Karl Fischer
 

Created on 06/28/11 at 10:48:28
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Karl Fisher Titration and the 20 Most Critical Questions

By Hank Levi on Sun, Jun 12, 2011 @ 12:27 PM

questionsAs a service provider of Karl Fisher testing apparatus, we see different moisture testing issues that many operators, managers, and even companies face. We have come to realize that helping operators become more knowledgeable about "the little things" can help boost confidence, improve performance and efficiency, and ensure accurate testing. 

Are you new to Karl Fisher Titration and just beginning to learn about moisture testing or has it just been a while since you had to pull the Karl Fisher Titrator out to run some tests?  Regardless of your reason we know how important it is to get up to speed quickly so you can be running tests and providing moisture test results to those who need them.

To help with this we have compiled a list of the 20 most critical questions to help operators navigate through the learning curve and gain a better understanding of Karl Fisher Titration.

Some examples of issues you will discover include:

1.  "Our Karl Fisher says 'OVER TITRATION' and the reagent is turning really dark. Why?”

2.  “Why won’t the instrument go into “Ready mode”?”

3.  “Results seem "all over the place", what should I do?”

4.  "We use a solids evaporator and we are getting ZERO moisture results. Why?"

5.  "How many tests can I run and when should I change out my reagents?"

 

Avoid unnecessary surprises by getting a copy of the complete list of questions and learn what the issues are and why they are important.

Created on 06/11/11 at 08:00:22

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Karl Fisher Titration and drift

By Hank Levi on Fri, Jun 03, 2011 @ 12:36 PM

karl fisher driftSimply put, drift is background moisture that the Karl Fisher titrator is detecting.  What is background moisture?  Well, it is moisture that the Karl Fisher titrator (specifically the detector electrode) is detecting inside the vessel -that’s not coming from your sample.  Drift or "background moisture" can be the result of having the titration vessel sitting idle for some time where moisture has slowly infiltrated and accumulated inside the vessel, or it may be the result of a leak that is allowing a small amount of moisture to enter the vessel continually.  Although we might like to think that the Karl Fisher titrator vessel is air-tight/moisture-tight, it is not.  Depending on how well the vessel is sealed there may be a little or there may be a lot of background moisture interference.  All Karl Fisher titrators deal with the drift issue.  Unfortunately drift cannot be completely eliminated but the good news is that it can be reduced, measured, isolated, and discarded from your test results.
Before a single test is run on a Karl Fisher titrator it must go into a “ready” mode.   But before the titrator can go into a “ready” mode it most likely will go through a “pre-titration” mode.  During the “pre-titration” mode excess drift (moisture) is detected and removed by the reagent inside the vessel.  A “ready” mode ideally will occur when the drift being measured is low and steady/stable – usually below .1 micro grams per second.  Once the drift becomes low and stable the Karl Fisher Titrator records the drift level and goes into a “ready” mode and will allow the operator to introduce a sample into the vessel.  Upon completion of the test the Karl Fisher titrator adds up all of the moisture detected over the duration of the test and subtracts out the known drift level that was also measured during the test.  This process of knowing what the drift was before the test allows the Karl Fisher Titrator to then determine and backout the drift -leaving only the moisture detected from the sample as your result.

 

Created on 06/03/11 at 12:38:02

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Karl Fisher Titration Advantages for measuring moisture

By Hank Levi on Thu, Jun 02, 2011 @ 11:12 AM

Karl FisherThere are multiple methods of moisture determination, including loss on drying, Karl Fischer titration, piezoelectric sorption, spectroscopy, and chilled mirrors among others. However, it is advantageous to use Karl Fischer (KF) titration in moisture analysis for the following reasons:

  • It is highly accurate and precise (Part Per Million Accuracy).
  • KF is specific to water determination. This specification is different from the other popular moisture analysis method, loss on drying (LOD), because LOD can detect the loss of any volatile substance. However, this specification is advantageous because it allows KF titration to work independent from volatile substances present in the sample
  • The process does not require large samples, which is typically truer with Loss on Drying where more sample is required to achieve higher accuracy and repeatability - which introduces another entirely different problem.
  • It does not require much time to perform an analysis since the samples are easy to prepare and the analysis itself is short in duration.
  • The method has a nearly unlimited measurement range (from 1ppm to 100%).
  • Karl Fischer titration can determine the moisture content of a sample in any state, whether it is a solid, liquid, or gas.

We hope the above advantages show some of the benefits that Karl Fischer titrators can provide.  Even today with technological advancements Karl Fisher Titration remains very popular not only because of the advantages we mention, but also because it is widely accepted as a standard for moisture detection and measurement.

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Karl Fisher Titration can be used to measure solid and liquid samples

By Hank Levi on Wed, May 11, 2011 @ 01:19 PM

We get this question a lot.  "How do you go about testing for moisture if the sample is in liquid form?..What about solid form?"

Well basically, moisture testing using the karl fischer method is a standard in the industry that measures down to the Parts per million (PPM) level.  The theoretical accuracy is down to 1 part per million level.  I say theoretical because usually any variance is due to atmospheric conditions and operator repeatability.  Specifically, and for this example, “coulometric” Karl Ficsher is best when you are using a small sample and expect and are trying to measure less than 1% (1%moisture =10,000PPM) of water (moisture/humidity) in your sample.  [Note: there is a volumetric Karl Fischer method vs. coulometric Karl Fisher method but for this discussion I am speaking from the coulometric Karl Fischer standpoint]

With this in mind,

A. If you are testing a liquid sample you only have to use the karl fischer titrator and directly inject the liquid sample with a syringe (usually around 1mL) into the vessel.

B. If you are testing a solid sample (that cannot be “broken down sufficiently with solvents like Xylene for example) you will use both the karl Fischer AND an evaporator oven.  The evaporator oven heats up the sample (usually the sample size is less than 1gram…we typically might use 1/10th of a gram..but then again we might use 3 grams -it really depends on how much moisture you expect to find). The evaporator is connected with a nitrogen gas source that is used to deliver the moisture via a heater tube on the evaporator into the titration vessel.

To see an actual demonstration of the Karl Fischer Titrator and the evaporator oven during an actual test please view the video below and watch the short 2 to 3 minute video.

 

To be sure there are many more things I could mention but this is a high level summary of the two approaches.

Hope this helps.

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